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Tibetan Institute of Performing Arts Turns 58

Wed, 05/31/2017 - 11:29
The Tibetan Institute of Performing Arts (TIPA) based in Dharamsala, North India turned 58. Listen to VOA's Dharamsala reporter Tenzin Sangmo's interview with Gen Samten, opera teacher at TIPA, the oldest exile establishment about the status of the organization and ways to effectively conserve Tibetan culture.   

Dalai Lama Releases Book Titled "Two Saints" by Arun Shourie

Thu, 05/25/2017 - 13:50
The Dalai Lama released a book titled, "Two Saints - Speculations Around and About Ramakrishna Paramahamsa and Ramana Maharshi" by veteran author Arun Shourie at the India International Center, New Delhi.  "As far as deeper experience of ancient Indian knowledge is concerned, I think, I am more Indian than you Indians," said Tibet's spiritual leader while addressing the audience about his commitment to revive ancient Indian knowledge. The event was witnessed by dignitaries including former Deputy Prime Minister of India Shri L.K. Advani, and bureaucrats and media personalities, accompanied by conversations between the author and noted personalities: Fali Sam Nariman, an Indian jurist and Shyam Saran a former foreign secretary to Government of India. The author, Arun Shourie, is a former editor and minister, and is one the most prominent voices in Indian public life. The book is published by HarperCollins India.

Dalai Lama Releases Book Titled "Two Saints" by Arun Shourie

Thu, 05/25/2017 - 13:50
The Dalai Lama released a book titled, "Two Saints - Speculations Around and About Ramakrishna Paramahamsa and Ramana Maharshi" by veteran author Arun Shourie at the India International Center, New Delhi.  "As far as deeper experience of ancient Indian knowledge is concerned, I think, I am more Indian than you Indians," said Tibet's spiritual leader while addressing the audience about his commitment to revive ancient Indian knowledge. The event was witnessed by dignitaries including former Deputy Prime Minister of India Shri L.K. Advani, and bureaucrats and media personalities, accompanied by conversations between the author and noted personalities: Fali Sam Nariman, an Indian jurist and Shyam Saran a former foreign secretary to Government of India. The author, Arun Shourie, is a former editor and minister, and is one the most prominent voices in Indian public life. The book is published by HarperCollins India.

Exhibit Illustrates Extreme Adaptations of Mammals Over Millennia

Thu, 05/25/2017 - 11:53
A giant rhinoceros the size of three African elephants once grazed on treetops in Tibet, but succumbed to climate change more than 20 million years ago. The high treetops disappeared, along with its food source, says Xiaoming Wang of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. Wang has done field research on the long-legged rhino, more formally called the Indricotherium, one of the stars of a new exhibit that shows how radical adaptations that aid survival in one setting can spell disaster in another. Through fossils and reconstructions, the exhibit tells the story of Mother Nature’s radical gambits to keep organisms alive in changing conditions. The show was built around an earlier exhibit from the American Museum of Natural History in New York, which also included ice age remains from the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles. Mammals that have adapted in the extreme include an ancient whale that walked on land and more recent pygmy mammoths on California’s Channel Islands, whose small size is illustrated with side-by-side jaw bones of a Columbian mammoth and its pygmy relative, which shrunk to cope with limited food resources on the islands. Many species challenged Climatic variations over the ages and the more recent incursion of humans have challenged many species, said Emily Lindsey of the La Brea Tar Pits, a site rich with fossils from the mammoths and giant cats that once roamed California, but died out more than 10,000 years ago. Seen in the exhibit are the extinct American lion, “which along with the cave lion in Europe was the biggest cat that ever lived,” Lindsey said. There are fossils from a scimitar cat, also extinct, and a long-gone subspecies of jaguar. “And then we have the mountain lion, which is the only one of those five big cats that’s still alive today,” she notes. Also known as the cougar, panther or puma, the species is represented with a photo of a celebrated cat that continues to roam through the hills above Los Angeles. “People thought he would just spend a couple of days there, then continue to move on or attempt to move on,” said Miguel Ordenana, who coordinates the amateur citizens scientists who make wildlife observations to help scientists better understand the region. Mountain lions, he said, typically do not survive crossing busy freeways, but this intrepid mountain lion is a survivor, as is his species. Arctic island was once like Florida Other mammals in the exhibit include the Batodonoides, a long-extinct shrewlike mammal from 50 million years ago so tiny that it could have perched on a pencil. The South American Macrauchenia, with a camellike body and giraffelike neck, had a flexible trunk, like an elephant. It went extinct a mere 10,000 years ago, but is represented here in a reconstruction. Earth’s extreme changes can be seen in a diorama of Ellesmere Island in the Arctic. Just 1,000 kilometers from the North Pole, it was home to warm swamps 50 million years ago and a host of animals adapted to a Floridalike climate. Those intense changes served many species well, but presented extreme problems. Especially as environmental conditions caused the Arctic freeze over, leaving Ellesmere Island one of the coldest and driest locations on Earth. An earlier version of this report had Xiaoming Wang's name misspelled. VOA regrets the error.

Exhibit Illustrates Extreme Adaptations of Mammals Over Millennia

Thu, 05/25/2017 - 11:53
A giant rhinoceros the size of three African elephants once grazed on treetops in Tibet, but succumbed to climate change more than 20 million years ago. The high treetops disappeared, along with its food source, says Xiaoming Wang of the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County. Wang has done field research on the long-legged rhino, more formally called the Indricotherium, one of the stars of a new exhibit that shows how radical adaptations that aid survival in one setting can spell disaster in another. Through fossils and reconstructions, the exhibit tells the story of Mother Nature’s radical gambits to keep organisms alive in changing conditions. The show was built around an earlier exhibit from the American Museum of Natural History in New York, which also included ice age remains from the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles. Mammals that have adapted in the extreme include an ancient whale that walked on land and more recent pygmy mammoths on California’s Channel Islands, whose small size is illustrated with side-by-side jaw bones of a Columbian mammoth and its pygmy relative, which shrunk to cope with limited food resources on the islands. Many species challenged Climatic variations over the ages and the more recent incursion of humans have challenged many species, said Emily Lindsey of the La Brea Tar Pits, a site rich with fossils from the mammoths and giant cats that once roamed California, but died out more than 10,000 years ago. Seen in the exhibit are the extinct American lion, “which along with the cave lion in Europe was the biggest cat that ever lived,” Lindsey said. There are fossils from a scimitar cat, also extinct, and a long-gone subspecies of jaguar. “And then we have the mountain lion, which is the only one of those five big cats that’s still alive today,” she notes. Also known as the cougar, panther or puma, the species is represented with a photo of a celebrated cat that continues to roam through the hills above Los Angeles. “People thought he would just spend a couple of days there, then continue to move on or attempt to move on,” said Miguel Ordenana, who coordinates the amateur citizens scientists who make wildlife observations to help scientists better understand the region. Mountain lions, he said, typically do not survive crossing busy freeways, but this intrepid mountain lion is a survivor, as is his species. Arctic island was once like Florida Other mammals in the exhibit include the Batodonoides, a long-extinct shrewlike mammal from 50 million years ago so tiny that it could have perched on a pencil. The South American Macrauchenia, with a camellike body and giraffelike neck, had a flexible trunk, like an elephant. It went extinct a mere 10,000 years ago, but is represented here in a reconstruction. Earth’s extreme changes can be seen in a diorama of Ellesmere Island in the Arctic. Just 1,000 kilometers from the North Pole, it was home to warm swamps 50 million years ago and a host of animals adapted to a Floridalike climate. Those intense changes served many species well, but presented extreme problems. Especially as environmental conditions caused the Arctic freeze over, leaving Ellesmere Island one of the coldest and driest locations on Earth. An earlier version of this report had Xiaoming Wang's name misspelled. VOA regrets the error.

Media People Have Important Responsibility to Promote Human Value: Dalai Lama

Wed, 05/24/2017 - 13:06
Tibet's spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama addressed the staff of Indian National Daily "The Indian Express" at Taj Mansingh Hotel in Delhi, where he talked about the importance of media in promoting human values. "On many occasions when I met the media people, I suggested that for the promotion of human value and compassion, the media also have important responsibility. So, must make effort," says Dalai lama. The Nobel Laureate also stressed on the importance of reviving ancient Indian knowledge, mainly the Nalanda tradition of Buddhist system of knowledge that is relevant in today's world. When asked about the Chinese government's involvement with the recognition of reincarnation of Dalai Lama, he said that the Chinese communist has no connection to it. The three-hour long interaction in the form of Q&A was attended by more than 300 people including some guests from foreign missions in Delhi, politicians, government officials, and businessmen

Media People Have Important Responsibility to Promote Human Value: Dalai Lama

Wed, 05/24/2017 - 13:06
Tibet's spiritual leader, the Dalai Lama addressed the staff of Indian National Daily "The Indian Express" at Taj Mansingh Hotel in Delhi, where he talked about the importance of media in promoting human values. "On many occasions when I met the media people, I suggested that for the promotion of human value and compassion, the media also have important responsibility. So, must make effort," says Dalai lama. The Nobel Laureate also stressed on the importance of reviving ancient Indian knowledge, mainly the Nalanda tradition of Buddhist system of knowledge that is relevant in today's world. When asked about the Chinese government's involvement with the recognition of reincarnation of Dalai Lama, he said that the Chinese communist has no connection to it. The three-hour long interaction in the form of Q&A was attended by more than 300 people including some guests from foreign missions in Delhi, politicians, government officials, and businessmen

Sikyong Attends Indo-Tibet Summit 2017 in Delhi

Sat, 05/20/2017 - 11:02
Dr. Lobsang Sangay, President of the Central Tibetan Administration attended the "Indo-Tibet Summit 2017" held at the Constitution Club of India in New Delhi on May 20, 2017 as a chief guest on invitation by the Delhi based South & East Asia Foundation. Dr. Sangay spoke on the importance of Tibetan issue in relation to India and concluded his address by saying that "if you want to understand China you have to understand Tibet" and applauded India for not participating in the recently held Belt and Road Forum (BRF) organized by China. "India didn't participate it. It is good. I think India has learnt from Tibetan story," says Dr. Sangay and continued that the final objective of One Belt One Road (OBOR) initiative is invasion and occupation as happened to Tibet. The summit was organized under the guidance of Mrs. Priyanka Singh Rawat, a Member of Parliament from BJP, and one of the main speakers of the summit was Mr. Gopal Krishan Agarwal, a National Spokesperson of BJP.

Sikyong Attends Indo-Tibet Summit 2017 in Delhi

Sat, 05/20/2017 - 11:02
Dr. Lobsang Sangay, President of the Central Tibetan Administration attended the "Indo-Tibet Summit 2017" held at the Constitution Club of India in New Delhi on May 20, 2017 as a chief guest on invitation by the Delhi based South & East Asia Foundation. Dr. Sangay spoke on the importance of Tibetan issue in relation to India and concluded his address by saying that "if you want to understand China you have to understand Tibet" and applauded India for not participating in the recently held Belt and Road Forum (BRF) organized by China. "India didn't participate it. It is good. I think India has learnt from Tibetan story," says Dr. Sangay and continued that the final objective of One Belt One Road (OBOR) initiative is invasion and occupation as happened to Tibet. The summit was organized under the guidance of Mrs. Priyanka Singh Rawat, a Member of Parliament from BJP, and one of the main speakers of the summit was Mr. Gopal Krishan Agarwal, a National Spokesperson of BJP.

Breaking News: Tibetan Monk Self-Immolates in Amdo

Fri, 05/19/2017 - 08:20
A Tibetan monk has set himself on fire to protest China's repressive policies towards Tibetans. Jamyang Losel, 29, from Gyerthang monastery has succumbed to his burns following the self-immolation protest in Chentsa County, Malho Prefecture, Qinghai Province on May 19, 2017.  Sources confirming the protest say that the local authorities arrived at the scene within minutes and confiscated the young monk's body. The body has not been returned to the family despite their pleading at the local police station.  

Breaking News: Tibetan Monk Self-Immolates in Amdo

Fri, 05/19/2017 - 08:20
A Tibetan monk has set himself on fire to protest China's repressive policies towards Tibetans. Jamyang Losel, 29, from Gyerthang monastery has succumbed to his burns following the self-immolation protest in Chentsa County, Malho Prefecture, Qinghai Province on May 19, 2017.  Sources confirming the protest say that the local authorities arrived at the scene within minutes and confiscated the young monk's body. The body has not been returned to the family despite their pleading at the local police station.  

Breaking News: Tibetan Monk Self-immolates in Tibet

Fri, 05/19/2017 - 08:05
A Tibetan monk has set himself on fire to protest China's repressive policies towards Tibetans. Jamyang Losel, 29, from Gyerthang monastery has succumbed to his burns following the self-immolation protest in Chentsa County, Malho Prefecture, Qinghai Province on May 19, 2017.  Sources confirming the protest say that the local authorities arrived at the scene within minutes and confiscated the young monk's body.

Tibet Museum Takes Part in International Museum Day

Thu, 05/18/2017 - 10:48
The Tibet Museum in Dharamsala, North India took part in the 40th International Museum Day on May 18, 2017. Dr. Lobsang Sangay, President of the Central Tibetan Administration inaugurated the two day program and said, 'Museums play an important role in introducing one's history and its participation in the International Museum Day could play a role in educating many on the real historical and present situation inside Tibet.' Tashi Phuntsok, the Director of Tibet Museum spoke to Tibetan media on the significance of participating in the International Museum Day and its effort in reaching Indian and wider international audiences. The two day event in Dharamsala will consist of talk series, movie screenings, and cultural performances.  Full report below:  

Tibet Museum Takes Part in International Museum Day

Thu, 05/18/2017 - 10:48
The Tibet Museum in Dharamsala, North India took part in the 40th International Museum Day on May 18, 2017. Dr. Lobsang Sangay, President of the Central Tibetan Administration inaugurated the two day program and said, 'Museums play an important role in introducing one's history and its participation in the International Museum Day could play a role in educating many on the real historical and present situation inside Tibet.' Tashi Phuntsok, the Director of Tibet Museum spoke to Tibetan media on the significance of participating in the International Museum Day and its effort in reaching Indian and wider international audiences. The two day event in Dharamsala will consist of talk series, movie screenings, and cultural performances.  Full report below:  

Tibetan Community Health Outreach Training Begins in Delhi

Mon, 05/15/2017 - 12:04
The Dharamsala based Central Tibetan Administration's Department of Health has organized a 6-day training program for the health workers of their branch clinics from the Tibetan settlements in the North and Northeast part of India in Delhi from May 15 - 20, 2017. 16 participants will receive training on "Comprehensive Community Outreach and Coordinated Care Workshop" from two main experts, Mr. Vikas Dagur and Ms. Pragya Pranjali. Experts are scheduled to train the health workers on how to make field visits, record health data of their respective settlements, and report back to the concerned. The training program is funded by USAID through the New York based Tibet Fund.

Tibetan Community Health Outreach Training Begins in Delhi

Mon, 05/15/2017 - 12:04
The Dharamsala based Central Tibetan Administration's Department of Health has organized a 6-day training program for the health workers of their branch clinics from the Tibetan settlements in the North and Northeast part of India in Delhi from May 15 - 20, 2017. 16 participants will receive training on "Comprehensive Community Outreach and Coordinated Care Workshop" from two main experts, Mr. Vikas Dagur and Ms. Pragya Pranjali. Experts are scheduled to train the health workers on how to make field visits, record health data of their respective settlements, and report back to the concerned. The training program is funded by USAID through the New York based Tibet Fund.

US Lawmakers, Indian PM Confer in New Delhi

Fri, 05/12/2017 - 07:37
A bipartisan U.S. congressional delegation led by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi discussed bilateral relations and regional security issues Thursday with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi, India. Pelosi and Modi exchanged views on cooperation, terrorist threats, global warming and human rights issues, including Tibet. "In our meetings with top government officials, the delegation expressed our gratitude to the Indian government and people of India for hosting His Holiness the Dalai Lama in Dharamsala and for the support of Tibetans living in India," said Pelosi, a California Democrat. According to Pelosi's website, the group spent two days in Dharamsala and met with the Dalai Lama as well as Lobsang Sangay, the head of the Tibetan government in exile.   During a welcome ceremony Wednesday, Pelosi said the delegation came to "pay tribute to His Holiness [the Dalai Lama], a visionary, a man of compassion, a man of hope."  She also expressed her commitment to support Tibetan causes. "Brutal tactics of the Chinese government to erase the religion, culture and language of the Tibetan people challenge the conscience of the world," she said."We will meet that challenge. Working together, we will meet that challenge." Representative Jim Sensenbrenner, a Wisconsin Republican, said the U.S. Congress stands in solidarity with "the Tibetan people to be free from the repression that has been put upon them for a very, very long time from Beijing." Pelosi said gaining a status of "authentic" autonomy for Tibet requires narrowing the differences between Chinese and Tibetan leaders. "To some in China, an autonomous, authentic Tibet is inconceivable. To us, it is inevitable," she said, "So we must shorten the distance between inconceivable to them and the inevitable to us." Pelosi led a congressional group to Tibet in 2015, which she said was part of Sangay's proposal for them to visit Tibet and Dharamsala to learn more about the Tibetan situation, according to Tibet.net. Dharamsala is the seat of the Tibetan government in exile. China considers the Dalai Lama a dangerous separatist who seeks Tibetan independence. The Dalai Lama, Tibet's spiritual leader, and the current exile government, or Tibetan Administration, say they seek only a "genuine" autonomy for Tibet under the People's Republic of China. International human rights groups and exiles routinely condemn what they call China's oppressive rule in Tibetan areas. They say pervasive surveillance and displays of military force are used to intimidate and quell dissent. The Dalai Lama told the delegation Tibetans do not need weapons in their struggle for autonomy, and he again called for nonviolence and compassion. The United States considers Tibet a part of China, but supports Tibetans' right to preserve their unique religious, cultural and linguistic freedom.

US Lawmakers, Indian PM Confer in New Delhi

Fri, 05/12/2017 - 07:37
A bipartisan U.S. congressional delegation led by House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi discussed bilateral relations and regional security issues Thursday with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi, India. Pelosi and Modi exchanged views on cooperation, terrorist threats, global warming and human rights issues, including Tibet. "In our meetings with top government officials, the delegation expressed our gratitude to the Indian government and people of India for hosting His Holiness the Dalai Lama in Dharamsala and for the support of Tibetans living in India," said Pelosi, a California Democrat. According to Pelosi's website, the group spent two days in Dharamsala and met with the Dalai Lama as well as Lobsang Sangay, the head of the Tibetan government in exile.   During a welcome ceremony Wednesday, Pelosi said the delegation came to "pay tribute to His Holiness [the Dalai Lama], a visionary, a man of compassion, a man of hope."  She also expressed her commitment to support Tibetan causes. "Brutal tactics of the Chinese government to erase the religion, culture and language of the Tibetan people challenge the conscience of the world," she said."We will meet that challenge. Working together, we will meet that challenge." Representative Jim Sensenbrenner, a Wisconsin Republican, said the U.S. Congress stands in solidarity with "the Tibetan people to be free from the repression that has been put upon them for a very, very long time from Beijing." Pelosi said gaining a status of "authentic" autonomy for Tibet requires narrowing the differences between Chinese and Tibetan leaders. "To some in China, an autonomous, authentic Tibet is inconceivable. To us, it is inevitable," she said, "So we must shorten the distance between inconceivable to them and the inevitable to us." Pelosi led a congressional group to Tibet in 2015, which she said was part of Sangay's proposal for them to visit Tibet and Dharamsala to learn more about the Tibetan situation, according to Tibet.net. Dharamsala is the seat of the Tibetan government in exile. China considers the Dalai Lama a dangerous separatist who seeks Tibetan independence. The Dalai Lama, Tibet's spiritual leader, and the current exile government, or Tibetan Administration, say they seek only a "genuine" autonomy for Tibet under the People's Republic of China. International human rights groups and exiles routinely condemn what they call China's oppressive rule in Tibetan areas. They say pervasive surveillance and displays of military force are used to intimidate and quell dissent. The Dalai Lama told the delegation Tibetans do not need weapons in their struggle for autonomy, and he again called for nonviolence and compassion. The United States considers Tibet a part of China, but supports Tibetans' right to preserve their unique religious, cultural and linguistic freedom.

High-Level US Congressional Delegation Pledges Continued Bipartisan Support for Tibet

Thu, 05/11/2017 - 13:16
A high-level bipartisan United States Congressional delegation led by House Minority leader Nancy Pelosi has pledged continued support for Tibet and called on China to respect Tibetan people’s basic human rights and end its repressive policies inside Tibet. During a public felicitation to the delegation members organized by the Central Tibetan Administration in Dharamsala, North India, delegation leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, Rep. Eliot Engel, Rep.Jim McGovern, and Rep. Pramila Jayapal spoke one after the other on the dire situation inside Tibet and demanded China to respect Tibetan people’s aspiration for freedom and justice. The delegation members also underlined the bipartisan nature of United States support for Tibet and the Dalai Lama and US Congress’s resolve to continue supporting Tibetan issue until the end. Delegation leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi has spoken about her visit to Tibet few years back and her interaction with the Chinese officials there. “We went to the Potala Palace and we saw the room where His Holiness lived. We promised each other then and there that we would do everything in our power to make sure he would return to that place.” Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner has spoken about the lack of freedom and justice in Tibet. “Only when there is justice in all of these areas, will there be freedom in Tibet. And that is what we, in the United States Congress, is firmly committed to”, said Rep. Sensenbrenner. Rep. Eliot Engel urged China not to interfere in Tibetan’s faith and religious practice. “Let the people of Tibet practice their faith. Let the people of Tibet determine their own future,” he said. He further affirmed his continued support to the Tibet cause and said, “We will never stop until Tibet is free.” Rep. Jim McGovern made it a promise to make it possible for Dalai Lama and Tibetan people to return to Tibet and urged China to release all the political prisoners in Tibet including the Panchen Lama. Rep. Pramila Jayapal emphasized the importance of preserving Tibetan religion, language, and arts. “United States has consistently and bipartisan way said that we stand with the Tibetan people, freedom, and justice”.

High-Level US Congressional Delegation Pledges Continued Bipartisan Support for Tibet

Thu, 05/11/2017 - 13:16
A high-level bipartisan United States Congressional delegation led by House Minority leader Nancy Pelosi has pledged continued support for Tibet and called on China to respect Tibetan people’s basic human rights and end its repressive policies inside Tibet. During a public felicitation to the delegation members organized by the Central Tibetan Administration in Dharamsala, North India, delegation leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi, Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner, Rep. Eliot Engel, Rep.Jim McGovern, and Rep. Pramila Jayapal spoke one after the other on the dire situation inside Tibet and demanded China to respect Tibetan people’s aspiration for freedom and justice. The delegation members also underlined the bipartisan nature of United States support for Tibet and the Dalai Lama and US Congress’s resolve to continue supporting Tibetan issue until the end. Delegation leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi has spoken about her visit to Tibet few years back and her interaction with the Chinese officials there. “We went to the Potala Palace and we saw the room where His Holiness lived. We promised each other then and there that we would do everything in our power to make sure he would return to that place.” Rep. Jim Sensenbrenner has spoken about the lack of freedom and justice in Tibet. “Only when there is justice in all of these areas, will there be freedom in Tibet. And that is what we, in the United States Congress, is firmly committed to”, said Rep. Sensenbrenner. Rep. Eliot Engel urged China not to interfere in Tibetan’s faith and religious practice. “Let the people of Tibet practice their faith. Let the people of Tibet determine their own future,” he said. He further affirmed his continued support to the Tibet cause and said, “We will never stop until Tibet is free.” Rep. Jim McGovern made it a promise to make it possible for Dalai Lama and Tibetan people to return to Tibet and urged China to release all the political prisoners in Tibet including the Panchen Lama. Rep. Pramila Jayapal emphasized the importance of preserving Tibetan religion, language, and arts. “United States has consistently and bipartisan way said that we stand with the Tibetan people, freedom, and justice”.

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